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Friday, June 11, 2004


DAILY 7: MARGARET THATCHER; NANCY REAGAN; FINAL RESTING PLACE; AT THE ROTUNDA; MAN OF PRAYER; ARRESTING ILLEGAL ALIENS; UNDECIDED VOTERS;  



MARGARET THATCHER: REAGAN THE LEADER
President Reagan saw instinctively that pessimism itself was the disease and that the cure for pessimism is optimism. He set about restoring faith in the prospects of the American dream — a dream of boundless opportunity built on enterprise, individual effort and personal generosity. He infused his own belief in America's economic future in the American people.


NANCY REAGAN AND HER HEARTFELT GOODBYE
Today, the 82-year-old former first lady faces her most exhausting day, a state funeral in a cathedral packed with the nation's and world's dignitaries, many of whom will want to bend and murmur their condolences, followed by a rapid departure back across the country, to a California burial before sunset.


REAGAN'S FINAL RESTING PLACE

RACHEL DICARLO WAS AT THE ROTUNDA

PETER ROBINSON: RONALD REAGAN WAS A MAN OF PRAYER
Reagan's favorite setting for prayer? The outdoors. "He didn't need a church to pray in," Clark said. "He referred to his ranch as a cathedral with oak trees for walls." Each time they went on a trail ride, Clark and Reagan would begin by reciting the famous prayer of St. Francis of Assisi that opens, "Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace." "Sometimes," Clark said, "the president would look around and say, 'What a wonderful place for prayer.' And sometimes he'd just look up at the sky and say, 'Glory to God.'"


BORDER PATROL IS ARRESTING MORE ILLEGAL ALIENS
More than 150 suspected illegal aliens have been arrested by the Border Patrol in a sweep of newly created "interior checkpoints," including bus stops, in several Southern California communities, signaling a change in the agency's immigration enforcement strategy.


UNDECIDEDS ARE FOCUS OF THE CAMPAIGN
Only about 5 percent of the voting public is undecided, about one-third of what is typical at this point in the campaign, according to several recent polls. That figure increases to about 15 percent when pollsters include supporters of Mr. Kerry and Mr. Bush who say they might change their minds. In addition to those who are torn between the two major-party candidates, and possibly Ralph Nader, there is a sizable number of Americans who are deciding whether to vote at all.


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