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Monday, June 21, 2004


"MY LIFE" BY BILL CLINTON IS MORE LIKE "MY LIE" - MICHAEL ISIKOFF IS A GULLIBLE REPORTER, BUT I WANT TO ASK, "HEY BILL, WHICH COUCH WAS IT?" 

Clinton claims in his new book that he was forced to sleep on a couch, after "revealing" the truth to Hillary about his affair with Lewinsky. The White House has more than 100 rooms and countless bedrooms, but gullible reporters like Michael Isikoff seem to believe the "couch" version. However, most reviews of Clinton's book are pretty harsh.

If Bill had to sleep on a couch, what was wrong with the Lincoln Bedroom?

Bill Clinton is more than willing to talk about Monica Lewinsky now that he's been paid more than $10 million to do so. In an interview with Dan Rather he said the worst day of his presidency was when he had to tell Hillary that we was going to testify truthfully in front of the grand jury. Apparently, that was worse than when American troops died in Somalia, in the Saudi Arabia Khobar towers, on the USS Cole or when hundreds of civilians died in Oklahoma City and in Waco.

Clinton claims that he told George W. Bush that he was especially worried about Al Qaeda but that Bush changed the subject. Funny, I wonder why Clinton didn't warn all of us Americans more about his so-called biggest fear.

Bill is looking for sympathy by crying about having to sleep on a White House couch. So, I'm wondering... Hey Bill, which couch was it?


Underwhelmed book reviewer

MICHIKO KAKUTANI: The Pastiche of a Presidency, Imitating a Life, in 957 Pages
Part of the problem, of course, is that Mr. Clinton is concerned, here, with cementing — or establishing — his legacy, while at the same time boosting (or at least not undermining) the political career of his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton.


JOHN BRODER: In a Sprawling Memoir, Clinton Cites Storms and Settles Scores
The book is sprawling, undisciplined and idiosyncratic in its choice of emphasis. It devotes nearly 100 pages to his childhood but treats large spans of his presidency as a travelogue of campaign cities and foreign capitals.



Gullible reporter

MICHAEL ISIKOFF: The Clinton Book
Exclusive: A first read of the much-anticipated 'My Life'
Clinton also urged Bush to visit North Korea in an effort to seal an agreement that would get that nation to end its nuclear program. Clinton says Bush listened, then quickly changed the subject, according to a copy of the book obtained by NEWSWEEK.


By Weston Kosova and Michael Isikoff: Bill's Self-Portrait
His book is vintage Clinton—by turns interesting and infuriating, inspiring and self-pitying. Unpacking the hotly anticipated memoir 'My Life'
In the book, which NEWSWEEK obtained from a bookstore last week, he writes that Hillary and Chelsea barely spoke to him after he came clean about Lewinsky, and that the president wound up sleeping on the couch for two months.


USA TODAY: Clinton book blitz includes swings at Starr - Ex-president's memoir gets lackluster early reviews

Update: See also, American Mind, Josh Claybourn, James Joyner, Steven Taylor, Instapundit, John Cole, Daily Pundit, Left Coast Conservative.

Update II: Presto Pundit

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DAILY 7: FRED BARNES; SOUTH KOREAN CAMPAIGN DONOR; ARKANSAS IN PLAY; JOHN HARRIS; U.S. NEWS ON BEN FRANKLIN, RELIGION IN AMERICA, & MCMANSIONS 



FRED BARNES: THE SHRINKING CLINTON
There are three primary methods of assessing, then ranking, a president. None helps Clinton. The first, most-often-applied test, goes like this: Did the president face an unprecedented challenge, did he respond boldly, and was he successful? Because they passed this test so impressively, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Franklin Roosevelt are rated by historians as the top three presidents. Clinton faced no great challenge to which he could respond boldly and successfully. He was president during the period Charles Krauthammer has dubbed a "holiday from history." In fact, Clinton has complained he had no major war or crisis to confront.


KERRY RETURNS SOUTH KOREAN'S CASH
John Kerry's campaign collected a maximum $2,000 check from the recently arrested son of South Korea's disgraced former president, and some of its fund-raisers met several times with a South Korean government official who was trying to organize a Korean-American political group.


DEMS THINK CLINTON CAN DELIVER ARKANSAS AND MORE
Regional differences could put Kerry at a disadvantage in this non-Yankee state. Republicans are eagerly trying to exploit them.

''An elitist New England senator,'' is how Huckabee, Bush's Arkansas campaign chairman, describes him. The governor says Kerry's views on gun control, abortion and gay civil unions are too liberal for Arkansas.
Are the Dems going to try fooling Arkansas into thinking their voting for Clinton instead of that Boston Brahmin, Kerry?



JOHN HARRIS: CLINTON'S FOCUS ON PERSONAL MAY HAVE A COST
That same week, he had a meeting with Cabinet members, widely reported at the time, in which he told them that beneath his genial surface he had harbored deep anger during much of his presidency, and that this had led to his lapse with Lewinsky.

Of his anger, Clinton remarked to Time, "I hid it pretty good, didn't I?"



U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT has a special issue, "DEFINING AMERICA: WHY THE U.S. IS UNIQUE"
Here are 3 interesting articles...

JOANNIE FISCHER: BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, THE SELF-MADE MODEL
Born the 15th child of a poor candle maker, Franklin received only three years of formal schooling. So while other future Founding Fathers, like Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, were receiving the best educations money could buy, an 11-year-old Ben set about educating himself--and never stopped. For starters, he taught himself Latin, French, Spanish, Italian, and German and used them all with flair. Then, having learned to play the harp, violin, and guitar, he delved into science, math, and philosophy.


JAY TOLSON: THE FAITH OF OUR FATHERS
Among advanced industrialized countries, America is easily the most religious


The "McMansion" is an assertion of a peculiarly American sense of identity and space; WHERE SIZE MATTERS
Whatever the case, American houses have clearly gotten much, much bigger. In 1950, the average single-family home was 983 square feet. By 1970, it was 1,500. Today it is 2,329.

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BLOGROLL ADDITION: OPERATION732 

A pro-Bush blog from France


Check out Jean-Baptiste's blog!

I found his blog through No Pasaran

It's a great blog and refreshing to see a voice from France that pokes fun at Chirac and supports great presidents like Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush.

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