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Sunday, September 04, 2005


"IT'S TOO LATE TO BE MAKING PLANS": DID LOUISIANA OFFICIALS DO ENOUGH FOR HURRICANE KATRINA? 

This WWLTV.COM story appeared on Friday, August 26, just 3 days before Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans:

"We were looking at it going up the East Coast two days ago and now it's looking like it will hit the central Gulf Coast," said Larry Ingargiola, director of the St. Bernard Parish Emergency Preparedness. "Like we always say, the only one who knows where a storm will go is the man upstairs."

More worrisome was that experts with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration warned that the hurricane's track could move even further west, Ingargiola said.

"We just hope our people are prepared," he said. "It's kind of late in the year to be making disaster plans."

Walter Maestri, the emergency director for Jefferson Parish, said he was concerned about the movement west and how it was intensifying.

New Orleans City Hall spokeswoman Tami Frazier said officials were watching the storm, and had activated what she called the lowest alert level -- monitoring storm movements.


"Kind of late" and "lowest alert level" are not exactly the words that should be said if a massive hurricane is headed toward a vulnerable area. Although the governor declared a state of emergency (and was urged by President Bush to implement an evacuation plan) officials should do everything they can to err on the side of caution. Remember the shop-worn adage, "better be safe than sorry."

I'm curious about the timeline of what went on in the state and city governments leading up to the hurricane's arrival.

Fri., Aug 26, WWLTV.com | Blanco declares state of emergency


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