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Sunday, September 04, 2005


WORLD NEWSPAPERS HAPPILY CRITICIZE USA AND BUSH FOR THE HUGE NATURAL DISASTER 

This is what newspapers around the world had to say about Hurricane Katrina's destruction the resulting loss of lives.

Notice how these newspapers express a thinly veiled glee at America's suffering, how they blame President Bush for everything and how they completely lie about the facts that led to this tragedy occuring.

Spain's El Pais

Up until Monday, Bush was the president of the war in Iraq and 9/11. Today there are few doubts that he will also pass into history as the president who didn't know how to prevent the destruction of New Orleans and who abandoned its inhabitants to their fate for days. And the worst is yet to come.

France's Liberation

Bush had already been slow to react when the World Trade Center collapsed. Four years later, he was no quicker to get the measure of Katrina - a cruel lack of leadership at a time when this second major shock for 21st century America is adding to the crisis of confidence for the world's leading power and to international disorder. As happened with 9/11, the country is displaying its vulnerability to the eyes of the world.

France's Le Progres

Katrina has shown that the emperor has no clothes. The world's superpower is powerless when confronted with nature's fury.

Switzerland's Le Temps

The sea walls would not have burst in New Orleans if the funds meant for strengthening them had not been cut to help the war effort in Iraq and the war on terror... And rescue work would have been more effective if a section of National Guard from the areas affected had not been sent to Baghdad and Kabul... And would George Bush have left his holiday ranch more quickly if the disaster had not first struck the most disadvantaged populations of the black south?

Ireland's The Irish Times

This is a defining moment for Mr Bush, just as much as 9/11 was. So far his reputation for prompt and firm crisis management has fallen far short of what is required.

Saudi Arabia's Saudi Gazette

The episode illustrates that when the normal day-to-day activity of society disintegrates, the collapse of civilisation is only a few paces behind. We all walk on the edge of the abyss.

Musib Na'imi in Iran's Al-Vefagh

About 10,000 US National Guard troops were deployed [in New Orleans] and were granted the authority to fire at and kill whom they wanted, upon the pretext of restoring order. This decision is an indication of the US administration's militarist mentality, which regards killing as the only way to control even its own citizens.

Pakistan's The Nation

To augment the tragedy, the government of the world's richest nation defied the general expectation that at the first sign of the storm it would muster an armada of ships, boats and helicopters for the rescue operation. For nearly three days it sat smugly apathetic to the people's plight, their need for food, medicine and other basic necessities.

Hong Kong's Wen Wei Po

This disaster is a heavy blow to the United States, and a lesson which deserves deep thought... [It] is a warning to the Bush administration that the United States must clear its head and truly assume its responsibility to protect nature and the environment in which humankind lives.


BBC NEWS | World | Americas | Press dismay at Katrina chaos


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"IT'S TOO LATE TO BE MAKING PLANS": DID LOUISIANA OFFICIALS DO ENOUGH FOR HURRICANE KATRINA? 

This WWLTV.COM story appeared on Friday, August 26, just 3 days before Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans:

"We were looking at it going up the East Coast two days ago and now it's looking like it will hit the central Gulf Coast," said Larry Ingargiola, director of the St. Bernard Parish Emergency Preparedness. "Like we always say, the only one who knows where a storm will go is the man upstairs."

More worrisome was that experts with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration warned that the hurricane's track could move even further west, Ingargiola said.

"We just hope our people are prepared," he said. "It's kind of late in the year to be making disaster plans."

Walter Maestri, the emergency director for Jefferson Parish, said he was concerned about the movement west and how it was intensifying.

New Orleans City Hall spokeswoman Tami Frazier said officials were watching the storm, and had activated what she called the lowest alert level -- monitoring storm movements.


"Kind of late" and "lowest alert level" are not exactly the words that should be said if a massive hurricane is headed toward a vulnerable area. Although the governor declared a state of emergency (and was urged by President Bush to implement an evacuation plan) officials should do everything they can to err on the side of caution. Remember the shop-worn adage, "better be safe than sorry."

I'm curious about the timeline of what went on in the state and city governments leading up to the hurricane's arrival.

Fri., Aug 26, WWLTV.com | Blanco declares state of emergency


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